How Google’s data can make you a suspect in a crime you didn’t commit

How Google’s data can make you a suspect in a crime you didn’t commit

We all know that Google is a powerful search engine. It also tracks our online activities, locations and interests. The tech giant collects and stores a lot of data about us, which can be useful for some purposes yet also risky for others.

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One of the purposes that Google’s data can serve is to help law enforcement solve crimes. Sometimes, when the police have few clues or leads, they can turn to Google for information on who searched for a certain term or who was near a crime scene at a certain time.

This also means that Google’s data can inadvertently implicate innocent people who happen to search for something or be somewhere that is related to a crime. They can become suspects or witnesses in investigations that they have nothing to do with.

There are two main ways that Google’s data is used in police investigations: search-term warrants and location warrants.

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A search-term warrant is a court order that requires Google to provide information on anyone who searches for a specific term or phrase on its platform. Google does not provide the names or personal information of the users who searched for the terms, but rather anonymized identifiers that can be linked to specific devices. However, this does not mean that the users are completely anonymous, as the police can use other methods to track them down, such as IP addresses, geolocation or subpoenas.

For example, in 2020, Denver police obtained a search-term warrant for anyone who looked up the address of a house where a suspected arson killed five people. They used this information to identify and charge suspects with murder. However, those suspects were not convicted. Their lawyers argued that the warrants violated their constitutional rights.

Search-term warrants are relatively rare, and their legality is still being debated in courts. Some judges have approved them, while others have rejected them as unconstitutional.

The main argument against them is that they violate the First Amendment right to free speech and the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures.

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A location warrant is a court order that requires Google to provide information on anyone who was near a certain location at a certain time based on the location data that Google collects from its users’ devices. These warrants can turn anyone into a suspect just by virtue of their GPS coordinates.

For example, in Florida, police obtained a location warrant for anyone who was near the site of a home burglary and used this information to investigate a man who rode his bicycle nearby. The debate here centers on the balance between collective security and individual privacy.

Location warrants are more common than search-term warrants, and they have been used in various cases, including the 2021 Capitol riot. However, they also face legal challenges and criticism from civil liberties advocates.

The main argument against them is that they are too broad and indiscriminate and that they sweep up innocent people who have no connection to the crime.

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The use of large-scale warrants for Google data has both advantages and disadvantages for law enforcement and the public.

On one hand, these warrants can help solve crimes that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to crack. They can provide valuable leads and evidence that can link suspects to crimes or clear them from suspicion. They can also help identify victims or witnesses who may need protection or assistance.

On the other hand, innocent people can get caught up in investigations that they have nothing to do with. Their privacy can be invaded, their personal information exposed, and intimidated and harassed.

According to Google’s privacy policy, they have procedures to protect the privacy of their users while supporting the important work of law enforcement. They state that they carefully review each request for user information and try to limit the scope or object to it if it is too broad or does not follow the correct process. They also say that they notify users of requests for their information unless they are legally prohibited, or there is an imminent threat to life or serious physical injury.

However, they also reserve the right to share user information with law enforcement in certain circumstances, such as when they have a valid legal process, a court order, a search warrant or an emergency disclosure request.

We reached out to Google for a comment on this story and had not heard back as of our deadline. 

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If you are concerned about how Google’s data can be used in police investigations, there are some steps you can take to protect your privacy and rights.

One step is to limit the amount of data that Google collects and stores about you. You can do this by adjusting your privacy settings on your Google account, using private browsers, turning off your location services or using VPNs, deleting your search history or using incognito mode, and opting out of personalized ads, or using ad blockers. Even then, there is no guarantee your location and personal information isn’t being recorded. 

Another step is to know your rights if you are contacted by law enforcement officials who want to access your Google data. You can do this by consulting a lawyer before you respond to any requests or demands.

Ask for a copy of the warrant or court order that authorizes the access. You can challenge the validity or scope of the warrant or court order if it is too broad or vague. Seek legal representation if you are accused of a crime or sued for damages.

Google’s data can be a powerful tool for solving crimes, but it can also be a potential threat to your privacy and rights. By being aware of how it is used in police investigations and by taking steps to protect yourself, you can enjoy the benefits of Google’s services without risking the drawbacks.

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Google’s data can be both a blessing and a curse in a police investigation. It can help solve crimes, but it can also get you in trouble. That’s why it’s important to be careful about what you search and where you go online and to know your rights if the police come knocking.

How do you feel about Google’s data collection and use in criminal investigations? Should it continue or be stopped? Let us know by writing us at Cyberguy.com/Contact

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